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Dating Violence and Solution
[384호] 2017년 04월 07일 (금) Kim Ji-soo (CSE 15) .
The Supreme Court delivered a death sentence to a male in his 20s who killed the parents of his ex-girlfriend and raped her. It was the only death sentence delivered by the Supreme Court during last three years. The man slapped his ex-girlfriend’s face because she insulted one of his friends, which led her to break up with him. However, he bore a grudge against it and caused violence to her. Her parents made a strong protest to his parents, which made him commit this awful crime. This is an extreme example of dating violence.
Actually, dating violence has become one of the major issues in Korea. According to research conducted by Munhwa Ilbo, 70% of people in a relationship have experienced dating violence. Insults were the most common form of violence followed by damaging property. On average, 18 people suffer from dating violence every day around the world, and one person is killed by his or her lover every three days. Both male and female are victims and attackers. No one is completely safe from this violence.
Over 40% of people who have experience of dating violence continue the relationship with the hope of their partners changing. Many people think the violence is personal events because the violence happens between couples. Though it seems there are lots victims and the damage is sometimes severe, the penalty level of punishing attackers is too low compared to the harm they cause victims. For example, stalkers make one’s life miserable but they are just punished with small fines.
The main reason dating violence happens is people think it’s not violence. However, to prevent further damage people should be strict about dating violence. It should be considered a severe crime and victims should seek professional help if their partners do something illegal: physical or verbal abuse, nonconsensual expressions of affection, blackmail, etc. Not letting a lover know all one’s personal information (like home address) is one good precaution. Harsher punishments are also an important part of the solution.
Falling in love with someone is one of the most beautiful and greatest things in the world. It’s like an oasis in this dreary busy society. However, the violence shouldn’t disguise its ugly head under the name of love. The status of Korean dating has a long way to go. However, if we protest against violence and ask for help actively while the nation amends the law to protect victims, things will improve.
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